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Species Papilio rumiko - Western Giant Swallowtail - Hodges#4170.1

Western Giant Swallowtail - Papilio rumiko Giant Swallowtail - Papilio rumiko Giant Swallowtail for California in April - Papilio rumiko Swallowtail - Papilio rumiko - male Giant Swallowtail - Papilio rumiko - male Papilio cresphontes? - Papilio rumiko butterfly - Papilio rumiko - male Western Giant Swallowtail - Papilio rumiko
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Papilionoidea (Butterflies and Skippers)
Family Papilionidae (Swallowtails, Parnassians)
Subfamily Papilioninae
Tribe Papilionini (Fluted Swallowtails)
Genus Papilio
Species rumiko (Western Giant Swallowtail - Hodges#4170.1)
Hodges Number
4170.1
Explanation of Names
Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, 2014
The species is named to honor the wife of the first author. Pronounced as ’roo(as in rue)-mee(as in meek)-koh(as in cod). The stress is on the first syllable. (1)
Range
CA to c. TX, CO / Mex. to Panama - Map (1)
See Also
closely allied to the now "Eastern Giant Swallowtail," the two species can usually be told apart by the shape and size of yellow spots on the neck, by the wing shape, and the details of wing patterns. (1)
Print References
Shiraiwa, K., Q. Cong, N.V. Grishin. 2014. A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck. ZooKeys 468: 85-135. (1)
Works Cited
1.A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck.
Kojiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin. 2014. ZooKeys 468: 85-135.