Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes


TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Xanthogaleruca luteola - Elm Leaf Beetle

Elm Leaf Beetle - Xanthogaleruca luteola Leaf beetle - Xanthogaleruca luteola Elm Leaf Beetle? - Xanthogaleruca luteola Unknown 'Bug' - Xanthogaleruca luteola Chrysomelid?  Lema? - Xanthogaleruca luteola Elm Leaf Beetle? - Xanthogaleruca luteola Elm Leaf Beetle. - Xanthogaleruca luteola Beetle at blacklight downtown - Xanthogaleruca luteola
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
Superfamily Chrysomeloidea (Long-horned and Leaf Beetles)
Family Chrysomelidae (Leaf Beetles)
Subfamily Galerucinae (Skeletonizing Leaf Beetles and Flea Beetles)
Tribe Galerucini
No Taxon (Section Atysites)
Genus Xanthogaleruca
Species luteola (Elm Leaf Beetle)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Pyrrhalta luteola, Galerucella luteola
Explanation of Names
Xanthogaleruca luteola (Müller 1766)
luteola = 'yellowish'
Size
6-8 mm
Identification
Adults have:(1)(2)(3)
Base color yellow to olive green, darker in overwintering form
Head with a dark occipital spot (behind and between the eyes) and typically a second black frontal spot (above antennae)
Pronotum with a dark central "hourglass" marking and two lateral spots
On each elytron a broad, dark stripe all along the outer margin, and a much shorter, dark (sometimes vague) medial streak at base (some individuals have elytra almost entirely dark)
Range
Native to w. Palaearctic(4), adventive and now widespread in N. America (more common in sw US)(5)(6)
Food
hosts: elms (Ulmus)(5)
Remarks
first detected in Baltimore, MD in the late 1830s(5)(6)
Considered a pest of elms(5)
See Also
Looks very similar to some members of Trirhabda, for which it is often mistaken. In Xanthogaleruca antennomere 3 is longer than (or subequal to) antennomere 4, shorter in Trirhabda(3); if these looks nearly equal, use other characters:
At the base of each elytron in the typical form of X. luteola there is a short, dark, medial spot or stripe(3) (may be obscured in forms with uniformly dark elytra)

In addition to the occipital spot present in both genera, X. luteola usually has a second "frontal" spot on the head just above the antennae, rarely present in Trirhabda
X. luteola is an introduced species and is usually found near parks or towns where elm trees have been planted. All our species of Trirhabda are native and usually occur in less disturbed areas.
Internet References
Fact sheet by A. Lawson(6)
Works Cited
1.Field Guide to Beetles of California
Arthur V. Evans and James N. Hogue. 2006. University of California Press.
2.Borror and DeLong's Introduction to the Study of Insects
Norman F. Johnson, Charles A. Triplehorn. 2004. Brooks Cole.
3.A Synopsis of the North American Galerucinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
John A. Wilcox. 1965. New York State Museum and Science Service.
4.Borowiec L. (200_-2013) Chrysomelidae: The leaf beetles of Europe and the Mediterranean subregion (checklist and iconography)
5.American Beetles, Volume II: Polyphaga: Scarabaeoidea through Curculionoidea
Arnett, R.H., Jr., M. C. Thomas, P. E. Skelley and J. H. Frank. (eds.). 2002. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FL.
6.Invasive species in California