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Species Psorosina hammondi - Appleleaf Skeletonizer - Hodges#5931

Unidentified  - Psorosina hammondi Unidentified  - Psorosina hammondi Pyralid - Psorosina hammondi Pyralid - Psorosina hammondi Psorosina hammondi Psorosina hammondi
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Pyraloidea (Pyralid and Crambid Snout Moths)
Family Pyralidae (Pyralid Moths)
Subfamily Phycitinae
Tribe Phycitini
Genus Psorosina
Species hammondi (Appleleaf Skeletonizer - Hodges#5931)
Hodges Number
5931
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Psorosina hammondi (Riley, 1872); n. comb. Dyar, 1904 (1)
Pempelia hammondi Riley, 1872; orig. comb. Riley, 1872 (2)
Psorosina angulella Dyar, 1904 (1)
Size
Wingspan: 11-15 mm (1) (2).
Identification
Forewings deep glossy dark-purple with two distinct white patches (2).
Range
From Connecticut, Ontario, and Iowa south to Kansas and Texas in the west, and North Carolina in the east. (3).
Season
One to three generations per year, depending on latitude. In the south, "there appears to be a late May-June generation, a late July-August generation, and a late September-October generation" (3).
Food
Hawthorn, cultivated apple, pear, quince, and beach plum (3).
Life Cycle
See Doerksen and Neunzig (1974) (3) for a detailed account of the life cycle.
Print References
Doerksen, G.P., and H.H. Neunzig. 1974. The Biology of the Appleleaf Skeletonizer, Psorosina hammondi, on Crataegus (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America 67(1): 146-47. (3)
Dyar, H.G. 1904c. Additions to the list of North American Lepidoptera. No. 2. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 6(2): 113. (1)
Riley, C.V. 1872. The Appleleaf Skeletonizer — Pempelia hammondi, n. sp. In Annual Report on the Noxious, Beneficial and Other Insects of State of Missouri. St. Louis, MO. 4: 44-47. (2)
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Additions to the list of North American Lepidoptera. No. 2.
Harrison G. Dyar. 1904. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 6(2): 103–119.
2.The appleleaf skeletonizer — Pempelia hammondi, n. sp,
C.V. Riley. 1872. 4th Ann. Rep. Noxious, Beneficial and Other Insects of State of Missouri. St. Louis, MO.
3.The Biology of the Appleleaf Skeletonizer, Psorosina hammondi, on Crataegus (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae)
G .P. Doerksen and H.H. Neunzig. 1974. Annals of the Entomological Society of America.
4.North American Moth Photographers Group
5.The Barcode of Life Database (BOLD)