Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Spread of Aedes albopictus and decline of Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Florida.
By O'Meara GF, Evans LF Jr, Gettman AD, Cuda JP.
Journal of Medical Entomology 32(4): 554-562., 1995
Cite: 1175964
PubMed

O'Meara GF, Evans LF Jr, Gettman AD, Cuda JP. 1995. Spread of Aedes albopictus and decline of Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Florida. Journal of Medical Entomology 32(4): 554-562.

Abstract
Waste tires and other types of artificial containers were sampled for immature Aedes to monitor changes in the occurrence of Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in Florida. The initial invasion and spread of Ae. albopictus in Florida occurred in the northern part of Florida. Throughout this region, major declines in the abundance of Ae. aegypti have been associated with the expansion of Ae. albopictus in both urban and rural areas. Generally, the same results have occurred in central Florida, but at some urban locations Ae. aegypti has remained a common mosquito long after the arrival of Ae. albopictus. In southeastern Florida, Ae. aegypti is currently the dominant container-inhabiting Aedes in urban areas, whereas sites dominated by Ae. albopictus are in rural settings or in undeveloped tracts of land within urban or suburban areas. At some locations, immature Ae. albopictus were found in the same containers with another exotic mosquito, Ae. bahamensis Berlin. The persistence of thriving Ae. aegypti populations in urban areas of southern Florida indicates that Ae. albopictus might not become the dominant container Aedes in these habitats, at least not to the extent that it has in the northern part of the state.