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Photo#1222914
Beetle - Nicagus obscurus - male

Beetle - Nicagus obscurus - Male
Block Island, Washington County, Rhode Island, USA
May 12, 2016
Along West Beach in the intertidal zone around low tide (out of reach of the waves) near Middle Pond.

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Beetle - Nicagus obscurus - male Beetle - Nicagus obscurus - male Beetle - Nicagus obscurus - male Beetle - Nicagus obscurus - male

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Nicagus obscurus (LeConte), male
This is Nicagus obscurus (LeConte). This is a great record, probably new for the state (have any Lucanidae even been reported from Block Island?). Katovich & Kriska (2002) listed an updated distribution, and the closest state records to RI are NY, NH, & NJ.

Nicagus obscurus is found in sandy areas along streams, rivers, and lakes. I don't see any reference to it being found on oceanic beaches, other than, possibly, a comment by Blatchley (1): "In the east it is said to frequent the vicinity of dead mussels"

It is a male specimen, and its genitalia are the same as my Indiana specimens.

 
Thanks!
Very exciting. It is indeed the first in the whole family for Block Island. I haven't been able to find the full list in Sikes (2004) but I do know that five species in the family had been recorded from the state by then, including Platycerus depressus (a new record from the paper), and presumably, given their abundance, Lucanus capreolus and Platycerus virescens. I have no idea what the other two might be but a new state record sounds likely to me.

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