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Photo#132755
under-rock click beetle - Hypnoidus abbreviatus

under-rock click beetle - Hypnoidus abbreviatus
Mt. Washington, Coos County, New Hampshire, USA
June 8, 2007
Size: about 4.8 mm
I found numbers of these small, hairy click beetles hiding beneath rocks in the lower and middle krummholz forest zone on both my single-day June 8 visit and my week-long June 30 - July 6 visit. Because of their consistent choice of cover I wonder if these might be in genus Hypoli*thus, which could be translated as "below rock."

Well, I now hear from Paul J. Johnson that all but one Hypol*ithus are now known as Hypn*oidus. So much for my theory :-)

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under-rock click beetle - Hypnoidus abbreviatus under-rock click beetle - Hypnoidus abbreviatus

Moved
Moved from Click Beetles.

Hypnoides abbreviatus
The coloration is much like that of Hypnoidus bicolor, but from what I could make out of the pronotal sculpture and frons, it looks more like H. abbreviatus.

Paul J. Johnson, Ph.D.
Professor of Entomology

Insect Research Collection
Box 2207A, Agricultural Hall 219
South Dakota State University
Brookings, SD 57007, USA

So, that´s
. . . what the suspected byrrhid larvae become when grown up :-)

 
Quite possibly.
Last I checked, no surviving larvae had pupated.

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