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Photo#13278
Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - female

Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - Female
Licking County, Ohio, USA
January 10, 2005
Size: < 1/2in

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - female Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - female Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - female Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - female Unknown Wolf Spider - Tigrosa helluo - female

Moved
Moved from Wolf Spiders.

eye arrangement
This image is being used in the eye arrangement article

Moved
Moved from Trochosa.

Absolutely fabulous!
The best photos I've seen. What camera are you using?

I agree with Lynnette, possible Pardosa spp.
I stumbled across your excellent series of images, and was compelled to apply a decent, on-line key for spiders. The key does give a good break down for Lycosidae, although it is specifically designed for New York... (but it will get you to genus for almost all native Lycosids). Your images were definitely clear enough for the key, since the key gets REALLY detailed...

I found it was a good match for either the Paradosa or Schizocosa genus based on your photos (couldn't take the last step in the key). :)

Oh, by the way, this beautiful creature is female... :)

Jay,
Here is a link that shows wolf spiders in your area. http://www.marion.ohio-state.edu/spiderweb/ProvisionalSpiderList.htm#lyco

My guess would be a Pardosa species, because they don't even list the Lycosas species on the Ohio site, which surprises me as that is a very common genus of wolf spider. One difference between Lycosas and Pardosa is that they eyes are closer together in the Lycosas than in the Pardosa. Also, the third set of eyes (barely visible in your photo) is farther away from the second set of eyes (two big ones) in the Pardosa species, much like in this photo. I'm basing this from the pictures in the Golden Guide, Spiders and their kin.

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