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Photo#1329671
Ectropis crepuscularia ? - Melanolophia

Ectropis crepuscularia ? - Melanolophia
Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Quebec, Canada
July 30, 2016

Images of this individual: tag all
Ectropis crepuscularia ? - Melanolophia Ectropis crepuscularia ? - Melanolophia

Moved

 
How about canadaria
If indeed Melanolophia as I suspected, it can only be canadaria.

Photo problems
Alain - I do not think the indistinct features of some of your moths with open wings are always due to wear but to too much scale-glare instead. I am not a skilled photographer by a long shot, but my experience tells me that the intensity of the light source (flash?) you use may be a problem, or the exposure setting. When wear comes into play, changing the angle of the light exposure (e.g. angle of photo taking with a flash) sometimes helps.

 
I just added the same picture
I just added the same picture, but a little underexposed. Perhaps this will allow you to see the characteristic traits. Thanks for your time !

 
Another look -
Having another look at your moth, this time on the darker image, my opinion is the same: the positions and shapes of the lines are more consistent with Melanpolophia canadaria (note the "V" ("flying seagull") of the PM line near the inner margin) than with E. crepuscularia.

No sure about this one
I wished the image was not so pale and one could see more of the lines and their "teeth." Anyway, the PM line of the hindwing looks to me to be too straight for E. crepuscularia. Perhaps a Melanolophia?

 
Ok find ! I'm going to let i
Ok find ! I'm going to let it Ectropis sp. for now. Thanks !

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