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Species Moodna ostrinella - Darker Moodna Moth - Hodges#6005

6005 Moodna ostrinella - Moodna ostrinella Darker Moodna Moth - Hodges#6005 - Moodna ostrinella Which Pyralid? - Moodna ostrinella Darker Moodna Moth - Moodna ostrinella Darker Moodna Moth - Moodna ostrinella Darker Moodna Moth - Moodna ostrinella Moth ID Request - Moodna ostrinella Darker Moodna - Moodna ostrinella
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Pyraloidea (Pyralid and Crambid Snout Moths)
Family Pyralidae (Pyralid Moths)
Subfamily Phycitinae
Tribe Phycitini
Genus Moodna
Species ostrinella (Darker Moodna Moth - Hodges#6005)
Hodges Number
6005
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Moodna ostrinella (Clemens, 1860)
Ephestia ostrinella Clemens, 1861
Size
Heinrich (1956) listed the wingspan 11-17 mm. (1)
Beadle & Leckie (2012) listed the "total length" as 8 mm. (2)
Identification
See comments on images--differentiate from other members of this genus.
Range
Heppner (2003) reported the range to include Nova Scotia to Florida, Manitoba to Texas. (3)
Season
Heppner (2003) reported January to December. (3)
Life Cycle
Heinrich (1956) reported peach, apple, pear, loquat, iris, oak and others. The larva is a scavenger of dried seeds, mummified fruits, dried rose buds, rose galls, cotton balls, and acorns. (1)
Clemens (1860) reported specimens on sumac fruits.
Print References
Beadle, D. & S. Leckie 2012. Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America. Houghton Mifflin. pp. 144-145. (2)
Clemens, B. 1860. Contribution to American lepidopterology, no. 5. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 1860: 206
Heinrich. C. 1956. American moths of the subfamily Phycitinae. United States National Museum Bulletin 207. p. 284. (1)
Neunzig, H.H., 1990. The Moths of America North of Mexico, Fascicle 15.3. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation. p. 73; plate 2, figs. 41-44. (4)
Works Cited
1.American moths of the subfamily Phycitinae
Carl Heinrich. 1956. United States National Museum Bulletin 207: 1-581.
2.Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America
David Beadle and Seabrooke Leckie. 2012. Houghton Mifflin.
3.Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas: Lepidoptera of Florida
J.B. Heppner. 2003. Florida Department of Agriculture 17(1): 1-670.
4.The Moths of America North of Mexico, Fascicle 15.3: Pyraloidea: Pyralidae (Part), Phycitinae (Part)
H H Neunzig. 1990. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation.
5.North American Moth Photographers Group
6.The Barcode of Life Database (BOLD)