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Genus Hexagenia

Is this a Dragonfly? - Hexagenia large mayfly - Hexagenia limbata large mayfly - Hexagenia limbata Iowa bug? - Hexagenia - female May fly, But whay type? - Hexagenia bilineata What kind of Dragonfly, or is it one? - Hexagenia Ephemeroptera - Hexagenia limbata yellow and black clear wings, kinda looks some kind of damselfly  i think  it was in 2011  - Hexagenia
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Ephemeroptera (Mayflies)
Suborder Furcatergalia
Infraorder Scapphodonta
Superfamily Ephemeroidea
Family Ephemeridae (Common Burrower Mayflies)
Genus Hexagenia
Other Common Names
Burrowing Mayfly, Giant Mayfly, Golden Mayfly
Explanation of Names
Hexagenia Walsh 1863
Numbers
5 spp. in our area(1), 8 spp. total(2)
Size
14-30 mm
Identification
Large; subimago pale golden yellow. Several species dark with bold striped pattern as mature imagos. Wings not uniformly dark, as are some other genera of this family. Pale brown band across abdomen. Antennae, legs, and tails yellow. (Photographs show either pale golden mayflies--probably subimagos, or very dark individuals, full imagoes?) H. limbata is very large (18-30 mm), widespread in east. H. bilineata is smaller, 14-18 mm, and is common in southeast.
Range
New World(2); in our area, all spp. occur in the east, H. limbata throughout NA, H. bilineata ranges to sw. US(1)
Habitat
streams, lakes
Season
May-Sep
Life Cycle
Eggs are dropped onto water surface, sink to bottom. Larvae (naiads) burrow in muddy bottoms of streams, lakes at up to 20 meters (60 feet) in depth. They usually spend one year in this stage, perhaps two in northern areas. Adults emerge in evening, disperse widely, coming to lights--often far from bodies of water.