Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#165322
Vanhorniidae - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - female

Vanhorniidae - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - Female
Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA
June 15, 1977
Size: ca. 7 mm.
Caught in a malaise trap.

Images of this individual: tag all
Vanhorniidae - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - female Vanhorniidae - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - Vanhornia eucnemidarum - female

Eucnemid hosts
I found them in Wisconsin over 12 years ago. The best time to find these wasp to search out a large tree with exposed hard sapwood of deciduous trees like maples. In June, Eucnemids like Isorhipis obliqua or Isorhipis ruficornis are seen swarming all over the wood surface, maiting. These beetles are maiting and laying eggs in the crevices. The wasps come in and seek out the eggs where she inserts her own egg inside the beetle's egg. So far, parasitism is known only in these two eucnemid species.

Great
I'll have to watch for these.

 
This guy seems to match. (maybe)
Brad, can you please check this guy out. (below) It may be a male counterpart to this female. (above)
Check out the pronotal carina, head and body shapes, wing pattern, legs, etc...everything but the stinger.
I'm not sure of the gender, but it has about 11 flaglellomeres. (F1 is shorter than her's)

 
As the name implies, they par
As the name implies, they parasitize the larvae of Eucnemidae. So I assume they would be found near old wood lots where rotten wood would be available for the beetles.

By the way, I got the specimen in the photo from John MacDonald. I believe John is retired now from Perdue, but working with the museum.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.