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Photo#19821
brown and black Digger Bee with white spots - Holcopasites calliopsidis

brown and black Digger Bee with white spots - Holcopasites calliopsidis
Fort Bragg, Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA
June 10, 2005
Size: around 10 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
brown and black Digger Bee with white spots - Holcopasites calliopsidis Digger Bee - Holcopasites calliopsidis

Duplicate
Duplicate

Moved

Holcopasites calliopsidis
not illinoiensis; note spots rather than bands

Anthophorinae
Why is this in Nomadinae if Richard ID'ed it as Anthophorinae?

 
:)
I deleted the subfamily Anthophorinae per your comments on the deleted page that it no longer exists. I should have copied and pasted that site you provided...oops.

 
sorry,
I had to add a new subfamily....and really didn't know what I was doing. :)

Cuckoo bee - most probably Pasites sp. (Apidae, Anthophorinae)
The waist between thorax and abdomen (gaster) excludes any Symphytan, hence any sawfly. These small bees, related to the genus Epeolus (and more distantly to Nomada), parasitize digger bees closely allied to Anthophora (here in Europe, essentially the genus Amegilla, which is quite abundant in North America too).

 
Pasites is only found in the Old World
and is in subfamily Nomadinae, not Anthophorinae (now included in Apinae)

In North America small nomadine bees generally parasitize Panurginae (none parasitize Anthophora and relatives in the New World).

Amegilla is unknown in North America.

On what basis do you consider Pasites closer to Epeolus? This is questionable.

 
I agree.
What a nice addition to Bugguide! Congrats:-)

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