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Photo#213733
big furry bee fly - Poecilanthrax tegminipennis

big furry bee fly - Poecilanthrax tegminipennis
Keene, Essex County, New York, USA
August 13, 2008

Moved
Moved from Bee Flies.

 
method
This may be wrong, but it resembles all of the other photos of this species with the brown wings and yellow pile and body shape (and resembles no other Poecilanthrax pictured here), plus it was photographed in the northern Adirondack Mountains, adjoining Quebec and Ontario (where the other specimens were located), and in habitat similar to the Canadian habitat because of higher elevation.

 
Andrew, how did you get this to species?
Just curious.

 
method
This may be wrong, but it resembles all of the other photos of this species with the brown wings and yellow pile and body shape (and resembles no other Poecilanthrax pictured here), plus it was photographed in the northern Adirondack Mountains, adjoining Quebec and Ontario (where the other specimens were located), and in habitat similar to the Canadian habitat because of higher elevation.

 
Well, Andy's with you now and he's the expert.
After making the leap to genus, your reasoning was solid and your technique certainly worked in this instance.

For future reference, if an expert gives you a maybe on genus, it's not a good idea to ID to species on your own. More often than not, this method results in a mis-identified insect that, in turn, is used to mis-identify still more.

Congratulations for posting the first from your state, heck the first from the U.S. for that matter.

ID
This is in the Villini, but I can't figure it out. Maybe it's Poecilanthrax. I think the angle may be foreshortening the wings and throwing off the long-winged look of Poecilanthrax. Do you have any other shots? A close-up of the face could show it to be devoid of scales, the key character for Poecilanthrax.

 
no
no other photo - it was hard enough getting this one!

 
ID
I think you nailed it. P. tegminipennis is what I was thinking of, but I was hunting for my Painter & Hall revision to see if it ranged that far NE.

Bee Fly -
at first I thought it might be one of the Bombylius spp, but I can't find one with all-black wings at the moment...

 
Good point about bee flies.
If you have a chance, Andrew, Browse through the bee flies, paying much more attention to wing patterns than body colors/patterns.

You'll likely get an expert opinion. (If not, move your post to Bee Flies, and it's sure to be handled later.)

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