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Genus Bruneria

Bruneria brunneus - Bruneria brunnea - female Bruneria brunneus - Bruneria brunnea - female Bruneria brunneus - Bruneria brunnea - female Bruneria brunneus - Bruneria brunnea - male Bruneria brunneus - Bruneria brunnea - male type of slant-faced grasshopper? - Bruneria shastana - female Grasshopper 1 - Bruneria brunnea - female Bruneria yukonensis - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Orthoptera (Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids)
Suborder Caelifera (Grasshoppers)
Family Acrididae (Short-horned Grasshoppers)
Subfamily Gomphocerinae (Slant-faced Grasshoppers)
No Taxon (Aulocara Group)
Genus Bruneria
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Brunneria McNeill 1897. Type species: Gomphocerus shastana S.H. Scudder [preoccupied invalid name; non Brunneria Saussure 1869 (order Dictyoptera)] The spelling Brunneria is incorrect, but still appears in some publications and web sites. It was mispelled in the original publication. Named after Lawrence Bruner.
Bruneria McNeill 1897 [Spelling corrected]
Bruneria Scudder 1897
Platybothrus Scudder 1898. Type species: Stenobothrus brunneus Thomas
Stenobothrus subgenus Bruneria (McNeill) Jago 1971
Explanation of Names
Bruneria as been variously been treated as a distinct genus, or asigned as a synonym or subgenus under Gomphocerus or Stenobothrus. Recent molecular studies show Bruneria species to be closely related to other North American genera such as Ageneotettix and Aulocara, and not particularly close to the Eurasian species of true Stenobothrus. So, Bruneria is best treated as a distinct genus.
Identification
Probably most easily confused with Phlibostroma, which usually has a row of four large dark spots on each tegmen (front wing), and in living insects usually has vertically striped eyes. Phlibostroma also has a larger head and no obvious lateral faveolae (small rectangular or triangular depressed or flat areas just to the front top of the eyes and above the antennae). Bruneria has usually more and smaller spots on the tegmina, faintly speckled eyes when living, and distinct rectangular (but not much depressed) faveolae. Psoloessa species can also look very similar, but do not have the top of the abdomen boldly banded black, and the space between the front of the eyes and antennae appears narrower. Aeropedellus can look somewhat similar, but is more slender, favors lusher habitats, and has the antennae at least somewhat clubbed.
Range
Boreal and Montane western North America.
Habitat
Usually relatively dry grassland/meadows, often in open woodland.
Season
Species of Bruneria mature in late spring or summer, having overwintered as eggs.
Food
Not well documented, but they tend to favor grasses, especially of the genus Agropyron [sensu latu] when reared in captivity.
Print References
Chapco, William and Daniel Contreras. 2012. 'Subfamilies Acridinae, Gomphocerinae and Oedipodinae are "fuzzy sets": a proposal for a common African origin'. Journal of Orthoptera Research, 20(1): 173-190.
McNeill, Jerome. March 1897. 'Revision of the Truxalinae of North America'. Proceedings of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences 6:198 & 264; pl.V (fig.26) [original publication of genus Brunneria].
McNeill, Jerome. May 1897. 'Some Corrections in Names of Orthoptera'. Psyche, vol. 8: 71 [includes correction of spelling to Bruneria].
Internet References