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wing venation

Wing venation of a fly, Anisopus Wing venation - Eristalis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
No Taxon (Glossary)
No Taxon (W)
No Taxon wing venation
Identification
Wing venation - the system and/or pattern of veins of the insect wing. The pattern of wing venation is important in classification of insects at almost all taxonomic levels.
Wing venation has its own complex terminology--thus is put in a glossary entry separate from wing. The exact terminology varies somewhat from group-to-group, but modern terminology is based on the Comstock-Needham System (1). See captions to diagrams above for details.

The principal veins run more-or-less lengthwise on the wing--thus called longitudinal veins. Connecting them are a lesser number of cross-veins. A closed area bounded by veins is called a cell.
A few groups, in particular syrphid flies, have a "spurious" wing vein--see photos and diagrams in that glossary entry.
Print References
Comstock, A Manual for the Study of Insects (1)
Internet References
North Carolina State University Entomology 424--Insect Wings
Brisbane Insects. Insect Wings Illustrations.
Works Cited
1.A Manual for the Study of Insects
John Henry Comstock, Anna Botsford Comstock. 1930. Comstock Publishing Company, Inc.