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Photo#232115
Identification aid for Lucilia - Lucilia sericata

Identification aid for Lucilia - Lucilia sericata
Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
September 28, 2008
Size: 6 mm
While Lucilia blow flies may not be identifiable to species based on the key using pictures of the top, counting bristles (setae) can eliminate half of the choices.

L. sericata has three postsutural acrostichal bristles, marked P1, P2, and P3 here. Other species in the genus with three are L. thatuna, L. cuprina, and L. silvarum.

L. elongata normally has two but sometimes has two on one side and three on the other.

The rest have two (except possibly L. magnicornis, a far northern species which is implied but not stated to have two in the key). If your fly has only one, see Neomyia (Muscidae).

Compare L. cluvia, which is missing this fly's P1:


Experts please correct my anatomy (or anything else).

Thanks to Terry Whitworth for producing the key to Calliphoridae and his email help identifying my picture.

Images of this individual: tag all
Blow Fly - Lucilia sericata Armpit - Lucilia sericata Blow Fly - Lucilia sericata Blow Fly - Lucilia sericata Identification aid for Lucilia - Lucilia sericata

Fine work!
Material of this nature will enable more and finer IDs from photos. Hope Tony Thomas sees this one!

 
Great information, however, I am not sure I am seeing
Great information, however, I am not sure I am seeing what is being described. When I look at the first example by clicking the L. cluvia thumbnail, I seem to be seeing all three (P1, P2, and P3) postsutural acrostichal bristles.

At least I feel sure there are three rows of bristles at the distal areas, while they are less pronounced in the medial positions, they seem to be evident. Maybe I am not understanding what to look for.

 
I see two
I see two acrostichal bristles on each side of midline, and outside of them three bristles on each side in the next set.

 
Then it is the sets nearest to the midline that are
Then it is the sets nearest to the midline that are the important ones to look at. I am not familiar with the term "acrostichal" so maybe that is the problem. All I was able to find was that something that is acrostichal is "acrostic".

I do see now that there are only two sets in the sets that are near the medial line, as you point out. Maybe my eyes were tired yesterday!

Thanks for pointing that out, John!

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