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Photo#24219
ant? - Gonatopus - female

ant? - Gonatopus - Female
Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, USA
July 13, 2005
I though at first that this is an ant, but now I'm not sure.

Moved
Moved from Dryinids.

Dryinidae: Gonatopodinae
almost certainly a Gonatopus sp.

 
Gonatopus sp.
The picture is adequate to tell the genus, but many of the species characters are tied up in that modified tarsi/claw arrangement. You can clearly see the transverse groove across the pronotum.

 
Dryinidae: Gonatopodinae
Thanks for the help, Douglas.

Congratulations Bill! :-)) Family Dryinidae
With finding a new family for the Bugguide.
This is a wingless female of the family Dryinidae.
Look at this photo for example:
http://www.myrmecos.net/insects/Dryinid1.html
The female are usually (but not always) very conspicious in having extraordinary formed forelegs with big grasping structures. With those they catch hoppers to lay there eggs in!
Greetings,
Gerard Pennards

 
That's exciting!!!
Thanks for the ID and all the info. With all the hoppers in my weed patch, this might be a good location to find some more Dryinids.

 
Bravo!
I second the congratulatory note! I collected two WINGED female dryinids in Cincinnati, so be on the lookout for those, too.

 
Thanks Eric
I'll be on the lookoutfor these and the winged ones as well. I passed this off as an ant and didn't realize it might be something else until I downloaded it. Too bad the shot wasn't better.

 
Nice educated instinct
Nice educated instinct in thinking this wasn't an ant. One of the more convincing ant mimics I've seen!

--Stephen

Stephen Cresswell
Buckhannon, WV
www.stephencresswell.com

 
Thanks Stephen...
The head and eyes didn't look right for an ant and the fact it had ocelli gave me a clue too. The abdomen didn't look quite right for an ant either.

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