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Photo#269250
Trigonogya reticulaticollis (Schaeffer) - Trigonogya reticulaticollis

Trigonogya reticulaticollis (Schaeffer) - Trigonogya reticulaticollis
Santa Ana NWR, 7 mi. so. of Alamo, Hidalgo County, Texas, USA
April 6, 2009
Emerged 19.iv.2009 ex dead branch of Fraxinus berlandieriana collected 06.iv.2009 at Santa Ana NWR, Alamo, Hidalgo Co., Texas.

Trigonogya reticulaticollis (Schaeffer)
Det. E. G. Riley, 2009

This sp. has only been collected three or four times previously...

Only known from southmost Texas...

Nice find!
Yes, the species has been collected only three times previous - once when originally described from Brownsville by Schaeffer (1904), again by Joseph Knull (1937) who reported collecting it on ash near the type locality, and finally 69 years later when I reared it from this host at Santa Ana (MacRae 2006).

Get ready - you will have all the bup guys asking if you have any extras :)

 
This one almost got away...
It had escaped to the outside of the rearing chamber when Ed found it on my last morning in College Station. (Rearing location, not coll. loc.) I believe Ed cut open the chamber but didn't find any more spmns... Mike

Well that would explain the m
Well that would explain the more squaty shape. I haven't seen any specimens of this species before.

Moved

Moved
Moved from Polycestinae.

 
thanks a lot!
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