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Species Euthyrhynchus floridanus - Florida Predatory Stink Bug

October surprise: Pentatomidae?  Species? - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Florida Predatory Stink Bug - Euthyrhynchus floridanus stink bug? - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Florida Predatory Stink Bug - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Unidentified - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Predatory Stink Bug Nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Euthyrhynchus floridanus in UV - Euthyrhynchus floridanus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Heteroptera (True Bugs)
Infraorder Pentatomomorpha
Superfamily Pentatomoidea
Family Pentatomidae (Stink Bugs)
Subfamily Asopinae (Predatory Stink Bugs)
Genus Euthyrhynchus
Species floridanus (Florida Predatory Stink Bug)
Other Common Names
Halloween Bug
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Euthyrhynchus floridanus (Linnaeus)
Orig. Comb: Cimex floridanus Linnaeus, 1767
Size
12-17 mm (1)
Identification
Black with orange or red pattern of adults is distinctive. See Internet references for discussion of somewhat similar stink bugs. Mature (4th instar) nymphs also distinctive, metallic blue/green and red/orange.
Range
TX-FL-PA-MO / Mex. to Brazil (2)(1)(3)
Season
mostly: Apr-Nov (BG data)
Food
other insects. Nymphs, and to some extent, adults, are gregarious, and may attack large prey in groups.
Life Cycle
bivoltine in FL (1)
Life cycle, egg-to-adult, is 60-90 days under favorable conditions. Adults may overwinter--seen near buildings in late fall, seeking crevices
Print References
(4)(5)
Internet References
Fact sheets: U. of FL, NCSU
Works Cited
1.The Pentatomoidea (Hemiptera) of Northeastern North America
J.E. McPherson. 1982. Southern Illinois University Press.
2.Catalog of the Heteroptera, or True Bugs of Canada and the Continental United States
Thomas J. Henry, Richard C. Froeschner. 1988. Brill Academic Publishers.
3.Pentatomidae (Heteroptera) of Honduras: a checklist with description of a new ochlerine genus
Arismendi N., Thomas D.B. 2003. Insecta Mundi 17: 219-236.
4.Florida's Fabulous Insects
Mark Deyrup, Brian Kenney, Thomas C. Emmel. 2000. World Publications.
5.Insects of North Carolina
C.S. Brimley. 1938. North Carolina Department of Agriculture.