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Species Anthrenus scrophulariae - Buffalo Carpet Beetle

Buffalo Carpet Beetle - Anthrenus scrophulariae Buffalo Carpet Beetle - Anthrenus scrophulariae Buffalo Carpet Beetle - Anthrenus scrophulariae Carpet Beetle - Anthrenus scrophulariae Anthrenus scrophulariae Anthrenus scrophulariae Ladybug - Anthrenus scrophulariae tiny black white and red beetle - Anthrenus scrophulariae
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
Superfamily Bostrichoidea (Carpet, Powder-post and Death-watch Beetles)
Family Dermestidae (Carpet Beetles)
Tribe Anthrenini
Genus Anthrenus (Carpet Beetles)
No Taxon (Subgenus Anthrenus)
Species scrophulariae (Buffalo Carpet Beetle)
Other Common Names
Common Carpet Beetle, Marbled Carpet Beetle
Explanation of Names
Anthrenus scrophulariae (Linnaeus 1758)
scrophulariae (L). 'a tumor' (1)
Size
2-3.8 mm(2)
Identification
Scales of dorsal surface black, white and red (or yellow), distributed in a characteristic pattern. Eyes notched in front, antennae 11-segmented, with club of 3 segments.
Range
Native to the Palaearctic region, introduced elsewhere, now cosmopolitan (more common in north temperate regions and less common in humid regions) and transcontinental in NA(3)(4) (n. & c. US + adjacent Canada)(5)
Records(6)(5): CAN BC NB NS ON PE QC USA CO CT IA IN KS MI MA ME MN MO NC NE NH NJ NY OH OR RI UT WI WV
Habitat
In some European countries is known to occur outdoors only (in bird & wasp nests, and on dead animals). There seem to be two biological variants: one breeds indoors and does not visit flowers, and one breeds outdoors.
Food
Adults feed on nectar and pollen(3); larvae feed on various animal materials (incl. wool, feathers, hair/fur, and museum specimens) and dried plants(4)
household pest known to attack dried insect collections(3)
Life Cycle
Adults copulate and feed on the blossoms of white flowers; the females require nectar and pollen to stimulate oviposition, which usually limits indoor infestations. Mated and fed females fly into houses or carried in on flowers. Once inside, or in an animal burrow or nest, the female lays eggs and dies. Larvae feed until the end of the warm season, when most pupate and the remainder overwinter.(4)
Internet References
Fact sheet - Larrick & Mitola 2010(7)
Dermestidae.com - Andreas Herrmann