Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes


TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Megalographa biloba - Bilobed Looper - Hodges#8907

Bilobed Looper ? - Megalographa biloba Unknown caterpillar - Megalographa biloba Unknown Moth - Megalographa biloba Bilobed Looper Moth - Megalographa biloba Noctuidae: Megalographa biloba? - Megalographa biloba Megalographa biloba  - Megalographa biloba Bilobed Looper - Megalographa biloba Megalographa biloba
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
No Taxon (Moths)
Superfamily Noctuoidea
Family Noctuidae (Owlet Moths)
Subfamily Plusiinae
Tribe Plusiini
Subtribe Plusiina
Genus Megalographa
Species biloba (Bilobed Looper - Hodges#8907)
Hodges Number
8907
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Megalographa biloba (Stephens, 1830)
Plusia biloba Stephens, 1830
Autographa biloba
Phytometra biloba ab. venezuelensis Strand, 1917
Autographa solida Ottolengui, 1902
* phylogenetic sequence #931209
Numbers
The only species in this genus in North America.
Size
forewing length 15-18 mm. (1)
Identification
Adult: forewing stigma very large, bilobed, silvery-white; silvery scales in lower half of reniform spot and AM line.
Range
Southern Canada except in the west, throughout most of the United States. (2)
Season
Adults fly from March/April to October/November; probably all year in far south.
Food
Larvae feed on alfalfa, barley, cabbage, cranesbill, dandelion, gladiolus, hedge-nettle, kidney-bean, larkspur, lettuce, plantain, sage, tobacco, vervain.
Remarks
In the northern parts of its range, is a migrant only (does not overwinter there).

A very widespread species; the type specimen was collected in Venezuela.
Print References
Eichlin, T.D. & H.B. Cunningham 1978. The Plusiinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) of America north of Mexico, emphasizing genitalic and larval morphology. USDA Tech. Bulletin 1567: 1-122. (3)
Lafontaine, J.D. & R.W. Poole 1991. The Moths of America North of Mexico, Fascicle 25.1; p.95; pl.2.1-2 (4)
Ottolengui, R. 1902. Plusia and allied genera with descriptions of new species. Jl. N.Y. Ent. Soc. 10(2): 64, pl. 6, f. 5 (Synonym Autographa solida)
Pogue, M.G. 2005. The Plusiinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Zootaxa 1032: 1–28 (PDF)
Powell, J.A. & P.A. Opler 2009. Moths of Western North America; p.278, pl.50.1 (1)
Strand, E. 1917. Archiv Naturg. 82 A (2): 49 (synonym Phytometra biloba ab. venezuelensis)
Internet References
Moth Photographers Group - range map, photos of living and pinned adults.
BOLD - Barcode of Life Data Systems - species account with collection map and photos of pinned adults.
live adult image (Jeremy Tatum, Butterflies and Moths of Southern Vancouver Island)
live adult images (Lynn Scott, Ontario)
pinned adult image and distribution (Matthew Barnes, Jamaica)
common name reference plus larval foodplants and flight season (Ohio State U.)
Works Cited
1.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
2.The Plusiinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) of Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Michael G, Pogue. 2005. Magnolia Press Zootaxa 1032: 1–28.
3.The Plusiinae (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) of America north of Mexico, emphasizing genitalic and larval morphology
Thomas D. Eichlin, Hugh B. Cunningham. 1978. United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin 1567: 1-121.
4.The Moths of America North of Mexico. Fascicle 25.1. Noctuoidea, Noctuidae (part), Plusiinae
J. Donald Lafontaine, Robert W. Poole. 1991. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation.