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TaxonomyBrowse
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Subfamily Lepturinae - Flower Longhorns

Flower Longhorn - Strangalepta abbreviata Small Black Longhorn - Grammoptera subargentata Centrodera tenera Casey - Centrodera tenera Flower Long-horned Beetle - Evodinus monticola - Evodinus monticola Longhorned Beetle? - Typocerus lugubris Beetle ID  - Rhagium inquisitor flower longhorns mating - Typocerus - male - female Surprisingly far south, but at high elevation (7600 feet) - Gnathacmaeops pratensis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Cucujiformia)
Superfamily Chrysomeloidea (Long-horned and Leaf Beetles)
Family Cerambycidae (Long-horned Beetles)
Subfamily Lepturinae (Flower Longhorns)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
tribal arrangement per(1)
Explanation of Names
Lepturinae Latreille 1802
Numbers
a large group, richly represented in the n. hemisphere: 6 tribes with 200 spp. in ~60 genera in our area and ~360 spp. in ~80 genera in the New World(1); 9 tribes worldwide(2)
Identification
They resemble Cerambycinae in having the terminal segment of the maxillary palps blunt or truncate at the apex. They differ from them in having the coxae conical and the bases of the antennae are usually not surrounded by the eyes. Many Lepturinae have the elytra tapering posteriorly and/or the pronotum narrower than the base of the elytra, giving them a rather broad shouldered appearance.

Keys to the Lepturinae of the Pacific Northwest(3)
Life Cycle
see Gosling (1984) for flwr associations (4)
Works Cited
1.A Photographic Catalog of the Cerambycidae of the New World
2.Family-group names in Coleoptera (Insecta)
Bouchard P. et al. 2011. ZooKeys 88: 1–972.
3.The Lepturine Longhorn Beetles (Cerambycidae: Lepturinae) of the Pacific Northwest
Phil Schapker. 2017. Oregon State Arthropod Collection.
4.Flower records for anthophilous Cerambycidae in a southwestern Michigan woodland.
Gosling, D.C.L. 1984. Great Lakes Entomologist 17(2): 79–82.