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Photo#29944
Bee Sp. Unknown - Hylaeus - female

Bee Sp. Unknown - Hylaeus - Female
York, York County, Pennsylvania, USA
August 26, 2005
Size: approximately 1 cm
This was a small bee as you might be able to tell from the leaf surface that he is on. If I remember correctly he was on a multiflora rose or similar plant. Thanks for your help. I appreciate it.

Finally!
For almost two hours I have been searching for this. One of these came in today, and well, thinking it was a flying ant, I quickly took it into a piece of tissue paper. Luckily I didn't kill it just yet. Because of it's scent.
Which leads to a question, do these wasps smell like lemon? Because the one I got sure does, however no matter how long I kept searching, I couldn't find anything that looked the same and had the smell.
But this one is just like it! The antennas look the same, so does the yellow markings (which is why I was so keen to finding what it is).

 
Bee
I do not recall it having a scent but I did't handle it either. Perhaps they do give off a scent like stinkbugs do when they are picked up. Glad you were able to find what you were looking for!

Moved
Moved from Yellow-masked Bees.

My guess is
it's a beewolf of some kind...see Guide Pages. You might want to wait and see what Eric thinks.

 
Wrong.
This is a female yellowfaced bee in the genus Hylaeus. Lynette can be forgiven, as the genus resembles wasps much more than bees:-) Male specimens of Hylaeus usually have at least the bottom half of the face entirely yellow, hence the common name. They are solitary, each female nesting in a burrow, or pre-existing cavity in wood, or in hollow plant stems.

 
Yellow-faced Bee
Thanks for your help, Eric. I appreciate it.

 
beewolf
Thanks, Lynette. That is one that I have not heard of before which is why I love this website! Thanks again, Ann.

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