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Species Pygarctia abdominalis - Yellow-edged Pygarctia - Hodges#8255

Yellow-edged Pygarctia - Hodges #8255 - Pygarctia abdominalis Yellow-edged Pygarctia - Hodges #8255 - Pygarctia abdominalis gray and orange moth - Pygarctia abdominalis Yellow-edged Pygarctia - Hodges #8255 - Pygarctia abdominalis Yellow-edged Pygarctia Moth - Pygarctia abdominalis Pygarctia abdominalis? - Pygarctia abdominalis grey and pink moth - Pygarctia abdominalis grey and pink moth - Pygarctia abdominalis
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Noctuoidea (Owlet Moths and kin)
Family Erebidae
Subfamily Arctiinae (Tiger and Lichen Moths)
Tribe Arctiini (Tiger Moths)
Subtribe Phaegopterina
Genus Pygarctia
Species abdominalis (Yellow-edged Pygarctia - Hodges#8255)
Hodges Number
8255
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Pygarctia abdominalis Grote, 1871
Pygarctia grossbecki Davis, 1913
Phylogenetic sequence # 930430 (1)
Numbers
Size
Wingspan:
♂ about 35 mm.
♀ about 45 mm.
Identification
Forewing is slate grey with pale yellow along the costa to almost the apex and also along inner margin. The thorax has two orange-yellow strips. Abdomen is orange-yellow above with a row of black dots along the length.
Range
Heppner (2003) included the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts; New Jersey to Florida to Texas. (2), (3)
Included in the Oklahoma checklist. (4)
Season
The adults are most common from April to August. (5)
Heppner (2003) reported February, April to June, August to September in Florida. (3)
Food
Heppner (2003) reported the host plant as unknown. (3)
spurges (Euphorbiacae) and dogbanes (Apocynacae) (6) [Randy Hardy]
Print References
Grote, A.R., 1871. Descriptions of Lepidoptera from Alabama. The Canadian Entomologist, 3: 124.
Works Cited
1.Annotated check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico.
Donald J. Lafontaine, B. Christian Schmidt. 2010. ZooKeys 40: 1–239 .
2.Moths of Dallas County, Texas
3.Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas: Lepidoptera of Florida
J.B. Heppner. 2003. Florida Department of Agriculture 17(1): 1-670.
4.Oklahoma moth species list by county (PDF)
5.North American Moth Photographers Group
6.Rare, Declining, and Poorly Known Butterflies and Moths of Forests and Woodlands in the Eastern United States
Dale F. Schweitzer, Marc C. Minno, David L. Wagner. 2011. U.S. Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team, FHTET-2011-01. .
7.The Barcode of Life Database (BOLD)
8.Butterflies of North America