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Photo#309934
14-spotted lady beetle egg - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata

14-spotted lady beetle egg - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
June 26, 2009
Size: ~1.2 mm
Note the pale green color, unlike the orange eggs of most other lady beetles. There was originally a small egg mass (4 or 5 eggs), but unfortunately the others were lost in transit.

Plant: Maple (Acer sp.). The tree was a small, bushy sapling, under 5 feet (1.6 m) tall.

(For life cycle photos of another lady beetle species collected from the same tree, start here: http://bugguide.net/node/view/300996.)

Images of this individual: tag all
14-spotted lady beetle egg - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 1 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 2 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 3 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 4 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 5 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva with prey - Day 6 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 7 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 8 (a), prepupa - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male 14-spotted lady beetle larva - Day 8 (b), prepupa - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata 14-spotted lady beetle pupa - Day 9 (a) - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata 14-spotted lady beetle pupa - Day 9 (b) - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata 14-spotted lady beetle with prey - Day 13 - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata - male

Bravo!
This is so valuable! I wish that more people took this approach; sometimes there is too much guess work involved.

 
Great series,
well done!

 
Thank you!
I'm really happy to be able to provide these images. Raising the larvae was enjoyable and only difficult when my garden ran out of aphids - which was about 6 days after egg hatch of the first lady beetle species. So now I'm also getting good at identifying aphid foodplants in the vacant lots and sidewalk cracks of Philadelphia!

 
Great series of photos, Abigail.
Very educational.

 
Much appreciated!
I consider that a great compliment coming from the Lady of the Tree Crickets - your work with them is inspiring!

(And I do not mean any offense with the nickname, but that's how I pronounce "Oecanthinancy" in my head when I'm reading it :-)

 
No offense at all...
...when I was into birding, someone called me the bird lady :) Apparently very few people are able to pronounce my 'name' -- but I say it as "ee can THIGH Nan see"

BTW, here in Wisconsin a major source of aphids in mid summer is Goldenrod plants -- especially when the buds are emerging.

 
aphid plants
Not a lot of goldenrod in the Philadelphia weed population, for some reason (we certainly have a lot of other weeds!), but I'm starting to see some of it. My aphids came from chrysanthemum in June, lady's thumb/smartweed (Polygonum) in July, and sow thistle (Spercus) in late July/August. I've stopped using oleander aphids, since they can be toxic, but they sure were visible and abundant from mid-July onward.