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Genus Brochymena - Rough Stink Bugs

Brochymena - Brochymena arborea Brochymena sp. - Brochymena sulcata  Brochymena pair NW Catalinas - Brochymena parva - male - female Is this a Brochymena affinis? - Brochymena affinis Brochymena Recent Molt:First Found - Brochymena arborea stinkbug nymphs - Brochymena Rough Stink Bug? - Brochymena sulcata nymph - Brochymena
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Heteroptera (True Bugs)
Infraorder Pentatomomorpha
Superfamily Pentatomoidea
Family Pentatomidae (Stink Bugs)
Subfamily Pentatominae
Tribe Halyini
Genus Brochymena (Rough Stink Bugs)
Other Common Names
Tree Stink Bugs
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Parabrochymena Larivière 1992 (see discussion here)
Explanation of Names
Brochymena Amyot & Serville 1843
Greek brochos (βρο'χος) 'net' + umen (υμη'ν) 'membrane'
Numbers
21-23 spp. in our area(1)(2); 6 spp. in NC(3)
Size
14-20 mm
Identification
Usually bark-like (cryptic). Lateral teeth on juga. Head elongated, pronotum laterally with toothlike projections, and rear margin of abdomen has pleated pattern.
Range
across NA south to Panama, but poorly represented outside the US(4)
Habitat
forests, orchards; on various trees and shrubs(5)
Season
Spring, fall (adults typically absent in mid-summer); Apr-May, Sep-Oct in KS
Food
phytophagous (some reports of predation)(5)
Life Cycle
Eggs are attached in clusters to twigs and leaves in spring. Nymphs grow slowly. Adults overwinter in crevices or leaf litter. A single generation per year.(6)
Works Cited
1.American Insects: A Handbook of the Insects of America North of Mexico
Ross H. Arnett. 2000. CRC Press.
2.How to Know the True Bugs
Slater, James A., and Baranowski, Richard M. 1978. Wm. C. Brown Company.
3.Insects of North Carolina
C.S. Brimley. 1938. North Carolina Department of Agriculture.
4.The Heteroptera (Hemiptera) of North Dakota I: Pentatomomorpha: Pentatomoidea
Rider D.A. 2012. Great Lakes Entomologist 45: 312-380.
5.The Pentatomoidea (Hemiptera) of Northeastern North America
J.E. McPherson. 1982. Southern Illinois University Press.
6.National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects and Spiders
Lorus and Margery Milne. 1980. Knopf.