Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#318676
Scorpion Spider?? - Metacyrba punctata

Scorpion Spider?? - Metacyrba punctata
Willis, Montgomery County, Texas, USA
July 7, 2009
Size: 8-9mm
I found this spider last month on our bathroom wall. I scooped him up and relocated him outside. I found your site days later, trying to find out what type of spider it is. I didn't think to take a pic of it at the time.

A few nights later, I found another one on our blinds in our bedroom. First thought is he looks like a tiny crawfish or baby scorpion but definitely a spider, unless scorpions can spin webs. I did see a pic of a pseudo scorpion but this looks nothing like one as you can tell from my pics.

It is only about 8mm long. It has 6 predominant legs and 2 pincer like front legs and looks like stingers on the tips. It is a very cool looking spider and am curious what type it is.

Thanks,
Greg

Images of this individual: tag all
Scorpion Spider?? - Metacyrba punctata Scorpion Spider?? - Metacyrba punctata Scorpion Spider?? - Metacyrba punctata

Moved
Moved from Jumping Spiders.

Looks like...
a male Metacyrba punctata.

See

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Looks like Hentzia
for Genus, but without higher-magnification photos it's hard to say on species. Possibly Hentzia palamarum; the males of that species also have large, dark front legs. They're quite common here in Oklahoma, which is fairly close to your location.

Male jumping spider.
This is some kind of jumping spider, and probably a male. The front legs are ornamented for use in courtship displays. The smaller appendages between them are "pedipalps," modified in males for the transfer of sperm to the female's genital opening. Totally harmless.

 
Male Jumping Spider
Thanks Eric! I appreciate the quick response and identification.

Greg

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.