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Photo#343313
Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus

Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
July 6, 2008
Does anyone know about these as indicators of water quality, or sensitivty to disturbance? These individuals live in a spring/waterfall in an area we are seeking to protect, and are wondering which inhabitants are sensitive species. Any insights or pointers would be helpful, thanks!

Images of this individual: tag all
Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus Fingernet - Dolophilodes distinctus

Moved
Moved from Fingernet Caddisflies. Dolophilodes prob. distinctus, det. Steven W. Hamilton (from larval specimen)

Found these this year, it's s
Found these this year, it's still early, and the tubes aren't yet full size. These are two larvae that fell out when I scooped up a couple nets. There's one small one (~5mm long, and one larger, ~1cm long. I am assuming they are the same species, and came from the tubes, I put the tubes and a bit of veg in a cup of water and these showed up. Sorry there's so many images, I'm not sure which were the key angles. Let me know if it would help to crop in more on some of those shots to try and bring out more detail on a particular feature. Thanks!

 
it will take .
it will take mature larvae and associated adults before you can do much more than you have. Like Jason said, there is still alot to learn about this group. It is great that you have a large population to work with - that is seldom the case. Good luck getting those mature pupae and adults. And keep taking those picture of habitat and what they are doing. On the dark one, is that a suture or a line of light pigment behind the eye? Is it in the other side of the specimen? On all the other specimens?

 
I'll keep looking, in the mea
I'll keep looking, in the meantime, I posted a habitat pic, if that helps. (not sure if that's ok on bugguide, since it's not the bug itself) I'm not sure which line you're refering to, but perhaps it is a reflection? Thanks!

Moved
Moved from Caddisflies. See note from Jason Robinson below the first image.

more info
For scale, the tubes are up to 1 cm wide, and up to about 5 cm long. The water comes out of the spring and straight to a cascade of water over thin shale, where these tubes are draped about in the open, some dangling from overhangs.

Could these be something other than Philopotamidae? We assumed these were typical for the family, but now other folks are saying these seem pretty unusual.

Wiggins (2004) says Philopotamid tubes are mostly under rocks, range up to 5mm wide, and the drawing has them fastened to a surface for most of the length of the tube.

Wiggins also says that the "larvae are distinctive because the orange-brown head and pronotum contrast with the creamy white colour of the rest of the body." The larva in the photo above seems to match, doesn't it?

There aren't that many options in this family, only 3 genera and 47 species...

 
unusual
Noah
I would have to agree with whoever is saying these are unusual. I think very unusual although I don't see many philopotamid larvae in their "natural" conditions, and never hanging down like this and this large. But from what I can see of the critter it could easily be a philopotamid, or maybe a polycentropid. But you will have to have one in hand and probably a scope to be sure. I will be glad to look at them if you can't find someone local to go out with you. Keep watching for adults. If warm enough (50-55) try a light trap.

dave

 
well
The thing is, I'm actually in Massachusetts now (at grad school) and they live in Tennessee (my native home). Although I visit from time to time, and the larvae often seem to be there. I may return this December, what would they do in winter? The adults wouldn't still be around then, right?

other trichopterists
Great picture! are they actually hanging down like that?

There are quite a few folks working on caddis in your part of the world. Check with Dave Etnier (dipnet@utk.edu) and if he cannot help he should be able refer you to others. Tell him I said hi. You will probably need adults to place a species on it.

Dave Ruiter

 
thanks!
Yep, they hang just like that, it's a little cascading waterfall right at the water source. Many of them also lie over the rocks horizontally, but many drape down...

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