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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Genus Calopteron

Net-Winged Beetle - Calopteron terminale Calopteron reticulatum? - Calopteron reticulatum - male - female Banded Net-wing Beetle - Calopteron reticulatum End Band Net-wing? - Calopteron Calopteran reticulatum or discrepans?? - Calopteron Calopteron NJ Net-winged Beetle - Calopteron discrepans Beetle - Calopteron
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Elateriformia)
Superfamily Elateroidea (Click, Firefly and Soldier Beetles)
Family Lycidae (Net-winged Beetles)
Subfamily Lycinae
Tribe Calopterini
Genus Calopteron
Explanation of Names
Calopteron Guérin-Méneville 1830 [Laporte de Castelnau 1838 in(1)]
'beautiful wing'
Numbers
3 spp. in our area, ~150 total(1)
Size
9-18 mm(2)
Identification
Large, boldly-marked net-winged beetles with broad, delicate elytra, flared out towards the rear.
Keys to spp. in(3)(pl. XXV) and(4) may not apply to all specimens
Range
New World; in our area, eastern (NB-FL to MB-TX)(1)(5)
Habitat
adults on flowers and vegetation, esp. near water(2)
C. reticulatum found on goldenrods, etc. in late summer, also in woodlands; C. discrepans and terminale are woodland species.
Season
late spring & summer(2)
Food
adults take nectar; larvae prey on small arthropods under bark
Life Cycle
Eggs laid on bark of dead or injured trees. Larvae feed on insects under bark and pupate there.
Remarks
some moths mimic these beetles
See Also
Moths that apparently mimic these beetles: Pyromorpha (esp. P. dimidiata), Lycomorpha (esp. L. pholus)
Works Cited
1.American Beetles, Volume II: Polyphaga: Scarabaeoidea through Curculionoidea
Arnett, R.H., Jr., M. C. Thomas, P. E. Skelley and J. H. Frank. (eds.). 2002. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FL.
2.Beetles of Eastern North America
Arthur V. Evans. 2014. Princeton University Press.
3.A Manual of Common Beetles of Eastern North America
Dillon, Elizabeth S., and Dillon, Lawrence. 1961. Row, Peterson, and Company.
4.The Beetles of Northeastern North America, Vol. 1 and 2.
Downie, N.M., and R.H. Arnett. 1996. The Sandhill Crane Press, Gainesville, FL.
5.Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera) of Canada and Alaska. Second edition
Bousquet Y., Bouchard P., Davies A.E., Sikes D.S. 2013. ZooKeys 360: 1–402.