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Photo#37131
Egg sac production - Peucetia viridans

Egg sac production - Peucetia viridans
Seminole County, Florida, USA
November 11, 2005
creating the tufts

Images of this individual: tag all
color change - Peucetia viridans - female color change - Peucetia viridans - female building the sac - Peucetia viridans depositing the eggs - Peucetia viridans depositing the eggs - Peucetia viridans depositing the eggs - Peucetia viridans depositing the eggs - Peucetia viridans Egg sac production - Peucetia viridans Egg sac production - Peucetia viridans Egg sac production - Peucetia viridans Egg sac coloration - Peucetia viridans

These are wonderful
images Jeff, Do you have an image of the sac as it turns into the green stage, before the brown?

 
It seems
the sac darkened slightly.

I browsed through your pictures. Great work. It is nice to see another Ogre face along with all the other FL insects and spiders. The wingless grasshopper is laying eggs, if still wondering.

I took a couple trips to Flat Island Preserve near Leesburg in the past month searching for P. cardinalis. If you have not been there, I recommend it. I was so busy I never made it past the grass field near the parking area. The island is actually a peninsula.

 
Thanks Jeff,
I don't think I have ever heard of that preserve, I would like to know where that is, sounds like fun. Most of my images are from my yard, amazing what you can find when you let the weeds grow:) and next to me is an oak scrub, I still have alot to find over there.

 
Click

 
Thanks
The green stage is immediate I believe. In other words, the sac would have green tints upon completion, and they would become evident during the final stages of egg sac production. Sometimes the sacs are plain, like this one. This is a specimen I collected in Seminole county, and since the sac is under artifical light, and not exposed to the elements, it may not change color at all. I'll keep you updated, though.

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