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Photo#371597
Unknown Weevil/Snout Beetle - Curculio sulcatulus - female

Unknown Weevil/Snout Beetle - Curculio sulcatulus - Female
Montrose, Laurens County, Georgia, USA
November 5, 2009
Size: unknown
I should have been able to find this one, but I simply can't. It's the first weevil I have ever seen boring into and eating an acorn. And what is with the red spot on the cheek? I can't tell if it is part of the weevil or a mite.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Weevil/Snout Beetle - Curculio sulcatulus - female Unknown Weevil/Snout Beetle - Curculio sulcatulus - female Unknown Weevil/Snout Beetle - Curculio sulcatulus - female

sulcatus is lapsus calami; the correct spelling is sulcatulus
Moved from Curculio sulcatus.

Moved

ID
Curculio sulcatus Casey A magnificent set of photos for feeding and oviposition behavior of this species. In the images left to right the rostrum is being pulled out of the oviposition holer in which she will lay her egg. First photo on left was taken after the middle shot and the third photo on the right was first.The debris from the penetration is adhering to her rostrm and not moving after she started to withdraw her rostrum She would groom her rostrum and clean it by using the forelegs and scrape the tissue off using the teeth and comb at the apex of the tibia She has vertical,not opposible mandibles and drills the hole, not chewing her way into the host acorn. A pleasure to see these photos, which really tell a story, and yes that is a mite, legs vissible in high magnification.

feamle Curculio doing her thing [she'll lay eggs there]
the red spot [on the thorax, not cheek] looks like a mite to me

Moved from ID Request.

 
Yeah, thorax, it's not on the head at all.....
Maybe next time I won't be so rushed. Have a new CPU coming this week, so maybe Da Bride (whose lap-top died unexpectedly) won't hog up my computer time so bloody much. Another gaffe: I definitely will wait when I run into this again to see how long the snout is. Obviously, this will help in IDing members of this genus.

 
you're right, Jon:
in this genus snout form is quite sp.-specific [but the taxonomy is a mess]

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