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Family Ypsolophidae

Ypsolopha falciferella caterpillar - Ypsolopha dentella 2391  - Ypsolopha rubrella Moth - Ypsolopha cockerella Ypsolopha unicipunctella - Hodges#2397 ? - Ypsolopha Ypsolopha cervella Micromoth - Ypsolopha rubrella Euceratia castella
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Yponomeutoidea (Ermine Moths and kin)
Family Ypsolophidae
Numbers
Three genera in North America: about 50 species of Ypsolopha (1), 3 species of Euceratia, and the introduced species Ochsenheimeria vacculella.
Identification
Adults - small with fairly broad forewings, hooked at the tip; at rest, the hooked tips project upward, giving a "duck-tailed" profile
Larvae - very active and react by rapid wiggling when disturbed (1)
Range
much of North America and southern Canada
also represented throughout Eurasia
Season
adults fly in summer
Food
specialist feeders of new spring folliage on a variety of shrubs and trees (1)
Life Cycle
typically feed from a weak silken shelter and pupate in a dense, envelope-like cocoon (1)
Remarks
Ypsolophidae was treated as a family by Dugdale et al (1999) in Kristensen N.P. (editor) Lepidoptera: Moths and butterflies. Volume 1: Evolution, systematics and biogeography. Handbook of Zoology. Walter de Gruyter. Berlin/New York.
Internet References
live adult images of Ypsolopha dentella (Lynn Scott, Ontario)
pinned adult image of Ypsolopha dentella (Kimmo and Seppo Silvonen, Finland)
live larva image of Ypsolopha dentella (Ben Smart, UK Moths)
classification of genus Ypsolopha in family Ypsolophidae (Brian Pitkin et al, Butterflies & Moths of the World)
Works Cited
1.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.