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Species Tachyporus nitidulus

rove beetle - Tachyporus nitidulus rove beetle - Tachyporus nitidulus Tachyporus abdominalis? - Tachyporus nitidulus Tachyporus? - Tachyporus nitidulus tachyporine - Tachyporus nitidulus Beetle - Tachyporus nitidulus Bryophacis? - Tachyporus nitidulus Bryophacis? - Tachyporus nitidulus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Staphyliniformia)
Superfamily Staphylinoidea (Rove, Carrion and Fungus Beetles)
Family Staphylinidae (Rove Beetles)
Subfamily Tachyporinae (Crab-like Rove Beetles)
Tribe Tachyporini
Genus Tachyporus
No Taxon (subgenus Palporus)
Species nitidulus (Tachyporus nitidulus)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Tachyporus nitidulus (Fabricius, 1781)

Synonyms: (1)
Staphylinus nitidulus Fabricius, 1781
Oxyporus brunneus Fabricius, 1792
Tachyporus faber Say, 1834
Tachyporus scitulus Horn, 1877 (misidentification)
Size
2.4-3mm

More accurate length is 1.1 to 1.4 mm (measured from apex of head to apex of elytra) (1)
Identification
Extremely variable species. Very small (head to elytra length 1.1 to 1.4 mm). Light yellowish to dark reddish-brown, sometimes darker. Head often darker than pronotum and elytra. Elytra usually lighter than pronotum and head. Pubescence of elytra and abdomen fine and dense. Pronotum glabrous, shiny. Apical segment of maxillary palps not longer than width of preceding segment. May have fully developed wings or reduced nonfunctional wings. (1)
Range
Native to, and occurs throughout, the Palaearctic; long established in our area and occurs over much of North America. Most abundant Tachyporus in North America. (1)(2)(3) (map)

State/Province Records: (1)(4)
CAN: AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK, YT
USA: AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OR, PA, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY
MEX: Campbell cites a specimen labeled "Mexico"
Habitat
Known habitats in Europe include under rotting materials (such as stacks of hay/straw, compost, mushrooms, leaf litter, and moss) and often swept from flowers and bushes. Usually favors moist habitats, and common in river debris. (1)

In North America it is known from similar, usually moist, habitats: leaf litter, clumps of grass and moss, debris from rotting logs and stumps, beaver lodges, and mammal nests (such as marmots and Microtus pennsylvanicus). (1)
Season
Adults have been collected year-round, but most commonly late summer and early fall. (1)
Food
Generalist predator. (1)
Life Cycle
Immatures unknown (?)
Remarks
first detected in NA: IN 1834(2)
Works Cited
1.A Revision of the Genus Tachyporus Gravenhorst (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) of North and Central America
J.M. Campbell. 1979. The Entomological Society of Canada.
2.Introduced Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) in the Maritime Provinces of Canada
Majka C.G., Klimaszewski J. 2008. The Canadian Entomologist 140: 48-72.
3.California Beetle Project
4.Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera) of Canada and Alaska. Second edition
Bousquet Y., Bouchard P., Davies A.E., Sikes D.S. 2013. ZooKeys 360: 1–402.