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Photo#380324
Anyphaena celer - female

Anyphaena celer - Female
Marlton, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
March 28, 2010
Size: Maybe around 4 mm?
Found in the kitchen. It thought that it was helping my wife cook much more than she thought that it was helping. (Been there!)
I have the spider if anyone wants to take a look. Adult female?
Same as this one and probably this

Images of this individual: tag all
Anyphaena celer - female Anyphaena celer - female Anyphaena celer - female Anyphaena celer - female Anyphaena celer Anyphaena celer Anyphaena celer - female Anyphaena celer - female Anyphaena celer - female

Moved
Moved from Anyphaena. Thanks again!

Moved
Moved from Spiders.

Ghost Spider
certainly looks right, I'm not sure about genus or species. Maybe John, Kevin or Mandy can tell you something about the epigyne?

 
Yep, Anyphaena is right...
...based on the position of the tracheal spiracale (halfway between the epigastric furrow and the spinnerets), we can count out Hibana... and based on habitus, we can count out the other 4 genera. I'll look through some Anyphaena epigynes and see what I come up with. I might end up needing a closer zoom of the epigyne, but we'll see.

 
Anyphaena cf. celer?
I think I see what looks like an epigynal hood in the closeup picture of the epigyne, which Dondale and Redner mention for this species. Would need a crisper picture to confirm, though.

 
A. celer
Yes, A. celer. The hood is quite pronounced. I'll try to photograph this epigynum as well.

-Kevin

Specimen: kmp-6221

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