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TaxonomyBrowse
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Species Cerceris fumipennis

Small Black Wasp - Cerceris fumipennis - male Cerceris fumipennis - female 9003103 Cerceris - Cerceris fumipennis Cerceris fumipennis? - Cerceris fumipennis Cerceris? - Cerceris fumipennis - male Cerceris - Cerceris fumipennis Potter Wasp? - Cerceris fumipennis Potter/Mason Wasp - Cerceris fumipennis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
No Taxon (Apoid Wasps (Apoidea)- traditional Sphecidae)
Family Crabronidae
Subfamily Philanthinae
Tribe Cercerini
Genus Cerceris
Species fumipennis (Cerceris fumipennis)
Explanation of Names
Cerceris fumipennis Say 1837
Identification
Dark smoky brown wings. One creamy yellow band on the second abdominal segment. Three light creamy yellow spots on the face.
Range
e. US, Ont. (BG data)
Season
most records: Jul-Aug (BG data)
Food
Larvae feed mostly on Buprestid beetles. (1)
Life Cycle
Ground nesting. The entrance to the nest is a hole about the diameter of a pencil.
Remarks
This species preys mostly on adult metallic woodborers (Buprestidae), including the invasive emerald ash borer. The wasp is even being employed to detect the presence of EAB. Please see this website for more information.
Works Cited
1.Field Guide to the Jewel Beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Northeastern North America.
Paiero et al. 2012. Canadian Food Inspection Agency. 411 pp.