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Photo#385505
wasps emerged from spiny rose stem galls - Diplolepis spinosa

wasps emerged from spiny rose stem galls - Diplolepis spinosa
Ackworth, Warren County, Iowa, USA
April 15, 2010
Size: 4 mm long
The wasps emerged! I've kept two galls in a clear plastic bottle in my garage and have been checking them daily. This morning (April 15) I noticed over a dozen small black wasps moving about inside the bottle. I quickly snapped this photo of two individuals through the plastic bottle before I headed out to work, but will get better photos later. Wasps are black-bodied (4 mm long) with reddish-brown legs and long antennae. Ventral view.

I know the caution that these might be parasitoids instead of the gallmaker, hopefully Miles Zhang or other experts can comment.

Images of this individual: tag all
twig gall on wild rose - Diplolepis spinosa twig gall on wild rose - Diplolepis spinosa twig gall on wild rose - Diplolepis spinosa wasps emerged from spiny rose stem galls - Diplolepis spinosa

D. spinosa male
The small black abdomen suggests a male, I also don't see ovipositors:)

 
Better photos
Here are clearer photos of an individual that I plucked from the bottle:


In addition to the numerous black, 4 mm-long males, I am also seeing some larger (5 mm), mostly brown individuals in the population that energed from these galls. I wonder if those might be females? I'll add photos of them later.

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