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For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
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Species Epargyreus clarus - Silver-spotted Skipper

A skipper - Epargyreus clarus Butterfly - Epargyreus clarus Skipper ID please - Epargyreus clarus Silver Spotted Skipper - Epargyreus clarus Silver-spotted Skipper larva - Epargyreus clarus Is this Symnodes lividigaster (yellow shouldered ladybird beetle)? - Epargyreus clarus Moth on squash - Epargyreus clarus Silver-spotted Skipper - Epargyreus clarus
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Hesperioidea (Skippers)
Family Hesperiidae (Skippers)
Subfamily Eudaminae (Dicot Skippers)
Genus Epargyreus
Species clarus (Silver-spotted Skipper)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Epargyreus clarus (Cramer, 1775)
43-50mm Wingspan(1)
Wings chocolate brown. Fore wings have an irregular golden band below and smaller yellow areas above. Hind wings plain above except for white fringe; large, silvery-white irregular spot below. Caterpillar, to 2”, has brownish-red head with two orange red "eye-spots," and yellowish to green spindle shaped body with narrow dark green bands.(1)

Throughout most of North America.(1)
Gardens, roadsides, and open areas.(1)
Adults fly throughout summer.(1)
Caterpillar eats foliage of leguminous plants, including locust trees, wisteria, alfalfa, and stick-tights.(1)
Life Cycle
It hibernates as pupa
This is one of the most conspicuous skippers, partly because of its size and partly because of its distinct silvery markings, which show while the insect rests. The caterpillars hide all day in silken nests among foliage, emerging to feed at night. There is one generation a year in the North; two or more in the South.(1)
Print References
Works Cited
1.Simon & Schuster's Guide to Insects
Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Dr. Richard L. Jacques. 1981. Fireside.