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Photo#40534
Red Insect - Rhagonycha fulva

Red Insect - Rhagonycha fulva
Pickering, Ontario, Canada
June 27, 2005
Size: 1/2 inch approximately
These small red insects were everywhere for about 2 weeks in late June early July, then disappeared. Could ayone tell me what they are??

Rhagonycha fulva
Thanks for the tip, Boris. Pat Bouchard verified the ID today. He said that R. fulva is well-established in Quebec and British Columbia but there are no specimens from Ontario in the Canadian National Collection; my photo and the above shot represent the first Ontario records. More info on species page.

Moved from Rhagonycha.

Opinion from Europe
Hi!
This one looks exactly like Rhagonycha fulva, as pointed out below.

I do not know about the look of R.excavata, but it is told to be different (compare similar discussion from Quebec: http://205.236.43.168/tm.aspx?m=3409 / in French).

Also the time of appearance and the habits of R.fulva, one of the most common species in Europe, are exactly reproduced by the beetle pictured here.

cheers, Boris

Cantharid beetles: Rhagonycha excavata

 
Moved to guide
Moved to a guide page for the species, incorporating this reference and a couple of others.

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
species ID?
I had speculated on a Rhagonycha species when posting this image last year, but there's apparently 11 species of Rhagonycha in Ontario listed here and I couldn't find photos of any of the others. The holarctic species Rhagonycha fulva ( 1, 2 ) looks similar but is only listed for BC in Canada.
Maybe someone with access to a collection can verify or correct this ID (?)
Incidentally, R. costipennis is on the Ontario list but this page says it's endemic to Florida, so I don't know what the situation is with it.

 
Boy!
A Pandora's box of question marks! Those species are *way* too similar. I quess we'd better leave it at genus level then.

 
Yes, genus level sounds good
Ah, as is often the case, I jumped to conclusions way too rapidly. Leaving at the genus level sounds appropriate.

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

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