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Photo#42165
Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus

Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus
Hudson, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
February 3, 2006
Size: 2.5 - 2.6 mm
Millimeter marks visible through bottom of clear plastic deli container.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus

Derodontidae: Laricobius rubidus
It is a derodontid. Of the two NH species I am pretty sure it is Laricobius rubidus, but will check tomorrow.

 
That's great! Thanks Don.
Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle, another new family for bugguide!

 
Derodontidae: Laricobius rubidus
It is indeed Laricobius rubidus.

 
The thing about Laricobius ru
The thing about Laricobius rubidus is that it's a predator, not a fungus eater. It preys mostly on pine bark adelgid, so could it be possible that it was just hibernating or something in the fungus?

http://everest.ento.vt.edu/~salom/ForEnt/Can_Ent_03.pdf
Here's an article about Laricobius beetles.

 
Ahhh!
Thank you, Crystal, for explaining why I'm striking out at finding another one by pawing through mountains of slimy fungi :-) I suspect the one I found had been hibernating.

I notice the article is about a different species, L. nigrinis.

 
Yup, it is, but they have ver
Yup, it is, but they have very similar habits. We often find random rubidus in our nigrinus colony, because rubidus also eats the hemlock wooly adelgid. (They usually come in as stowaways in the food.) : D

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