Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#42582
Another Strange Xylocopa from Florida - Xylocopa micans - male

Another Strange Xylocopa from Florida - Xylocopa micans - Male
Vero Beach, Indian River County, Florida, USA
February 10, 2006
Size: 3cm

Images of this individual: tag all
Another Strange Xylocopa from Florida - Xylocopa micans - male Another Strange Xylocopa from Florida - Xylocopa micans - male Another Strange Xylocopa from Florida - Xylocopa micans - male

Great shots
I've noticed this past week at the bush where I take my pics one of these. Whereas the other bees and insects go about their business, this one is very agressive. So much so it won't even let me stand there let alone take photos.
Carla Finley
Venice, FL
http://community.webshots.com/user/CarlaFinley

 
Territory
My guess at this is that the male stakes out a territory near some nice flowers. Then he defends it from other males and larger creatures, taking the opportunity to mate with females attracted to the flowers. He will periodically need to take some nectar himself, but I think this is why they make their presence known when someone comes around. The males of course have no sting, so it is all a bluff.
-Sean McCann


triatoma.blogspot.com

 
Bluffed
I was bluffed. He comes right to within 6 inches of my face and after a few times of this, I give up trying to photograph anything. Good thing he doesn't sting. Thanks for the info.
Carla Finley
Venice, FL
http://community.webshots.com/user/CarlaFinley

Very nice
Great images, awesome bee. Are they common around here? I have never seen a bee like that in our area.
Could this be a X. micans male?
Maybe this is similar to my CA bee question.

 
probably.
It could very well be. It seems to match very well with these images:http://pick4.pick.uga.edu/mp/20q?search=Xylocopa+micans&guide=Xylocopa. That would mean that this is also likely a male:.
-Sean McCann
You can see some more of my photos at triatoma.blogspot.com

 
yep
After seeing this site, I am certainly going to go with Xylocopa micans male. This site: http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/misc/bees/xylocopa.htm lists only two species in Florida, and the greenish blue metallic abdomen and large size confirms it. I am going to move this. Let me know if here are any objections.
-Sean McCann
You can see some more of my photos at triatoma.blogspot.com

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.