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Species Chionea valga - Snow Fly

 
 
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The crane fly genus Chionea in North America
By George W. Byers
University of Kansas Science Bulletin, 1983
Byers, George W. "The crane fly genus Chionea in North America," University of Kansas Science Bulletin 52:59-195.

A revision of the genus with new species, key, and description of biology and habits so far as they are known.

Online at biostor.org.

Diptera of the superfamily Tipuloidea found in the District of Columbia
By Alexander, C. P. and McAtee, W. L
Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 58(2344): 385-435, 1920
full text

I can't vouch for how useful this paper still is but it does contain keys to many genera

Manual for the identification of aquatic crane fly larvae for North America
By Gelhaus J.K.
Salt Lake City UT. 212 pp., 2008
Prepared for North American Benthological Society Workshop, May 2008, Salt Lake City UT.

Essentially, adopted from(1)

Manual for the identification of aquatic crane fly larvae for southeastern United States
By Gelhaus J.K.
Durham NC, 206 pp., 2002

The crane flies of California
By Alexander C.P.
Bull. Calif. Insect Survey 8: 1-269, 1967

Catalogue of American Nycteribiidae (Diptera, Hippoboscoidea)
By Gustavo Graciolli, Analía G. Autino & Guillermo L. Claps
Revista Brasileira de Entomologia 51(2): 142-159, 2007

The Secret Life of Flies
By Erica McAlister
Natural History Museum, London, 2017
Available on Amazon.

Images posted on Bugguide which appear in this book:

Please let me know if I missed any; I will add.

Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida.
By Pascarella, J.B., K.D. Waddington & P.R. Neal.
Biodiversity and Conservation, 10(4): 551–566., 2001
Springer Link

Pascarella, J.B., K.D. Waddington & P.R. Neal. 2001. Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida. Biodiversity and Conservation, 10(4): 551–566.

Abstract

The non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, was surveyed during 1995–1997 as part of a community pollinator survey. One hundred and thirty one sampling trips were made to four areas of Everglades National Park (Shark Valley, Chekika, Long Pine Key (LPK), and Flamingo). Species–month curves indicate that the sampling effort resulted in capture of most of the flower-visiting animal species in the park. A total of 143 insects and 1 bird species were recorded. Diptera were the most diverse group (55 spp.), followed by Lepidoptera (42 spp.) and non-apoid Hymenoptera (34 spp.). The majority of species were rare (56% of species were found on fewer than five trips). The highest diversity of species was found from January to May during the peak flowering period in some plant communities. The greatest total diversity was found in Long Pine Key and Shark Valley had the lowest diversity. Chekika and Flamingo were intermediate in diversity. Animals visited 178 plant species,∼26% of the potentially animal pollinated Angiosperm diversity of the park. Twenty-five species of plants had only non-apoid flower visitors; the majority of these species had only visits by Lepidoptera. Potentially important pollinator species include members of the Syrphidae, Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera. However, many of the flower-visiting species may not be effective pollinators. This study will be useful for designing sampling protocols for including invertebrates in assessments of ecological restoration underway in the Everglades ecosystem and for more detailed studies of the importance of non-apoid flower-visitors as effective pollinators.

 
 
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