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Photo#447943
Field Wolf Spider - Tigrosa annexa - male

Field Wolf Spider - Tigrosa annexa - Male
Orlando, Orange County, Florida, USA
August 27, 2010
I posted some pictures earlier that were of poor quality but it was assumed that the spiders I'm finding are wolf spiders.
I just happened to have my camera in hand when I came across this guy. So here's a clear image. Now it can be identified without a doubt. Are the spiders I'm coming across actually wold spiders? Also, is this a male or female?

Moved

Moved
Moved from Wolf Spiders.

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Moved from Spiders.

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Moved from ID Request.

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a male Schizocosa sp?

Tropical Wolf Spider?
The shape and markings remind me of the tropical types of wolf spiders. They can be larger and a bit flatter, I understand.

Some of them or most of them may be wolf spiders. I come across quite a few species of spiders in my home regularly. And I'm in Northern Minnesota! Imagine all the species you have.

Luckily, the ones you are coming across are probably harmless beneficial species that are just looking for either a meal or a mate. As I said before, spiders are reluctant to bite unless it is very necessary, and those bites are normally itchy or sore welts that go away eventually. Sometimes you get allergic reactions to any bug bite, and the swelling can seem to get worse and then eventually clear up. I've had bites from mosquitoes that didn't go away for a week. If it's really a concern, a doctor may be able to help you. Without the creature that bit your child, it's still just about impossible for even a medical professional to identify what bit them.

These spiders can be coaxed into a jar or glass and released outside. They can be a good learning tool for kids about nature and compassion for living things.

This one may be a male, though I'm not familiar with this species. Males usually have smaller abdomens and have enlarged structures on their palps, which are mouthparts that look like miniature legs at their front.

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