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Photo#47527
Tick?? If so, the largest tick(s) I have ever seen!! - Dermacentor andersoni

Tick?? If so, the largest tick(s) I have ever seen!! - Dermacentor andersoni
N. of Terrace, British Columbia, Canada
April 10, 2006
Size: 13-15mm w by 20-22mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Tick?? If so, the largest tick(s) I have ever seen!! - Dermacentor andersoni Tick?? If so, the largest tick(s) I have ever seen!! - Dermacentor andersoni Tick?? If so, the largest tick(s) I have ever seen!! - Dermacentor andersoni

Moved
Moved from Ticks.

Moved
Moved from Ticks.

 
From the scutum (shield like
From the scutum (shield like plate behind the mouthparts) this certainly looks like a Dermacentor tick, and if this was found in South-eastern British Columbia, it's probably Dermacentor andersoni (engorged female).

If you think this tick is large, you should see the ones I work with: the African tick, Amblyomma hebraeum. It is a full 3-5 times larger than D. andersoni! The normal engorged weight of D. andersoni is averages about 500-700 mg. A. hebraeum averages 2000 - 3000 mg. We've occasionally had engorged specimens exceed 3500 mg!

 
For the record:
W. Reuben Kaufman, Professor,
Department of Biological Sciences,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

this is a fully engorged tick
this is a fully engorged tick in the family Ixodidae. i can never really tell the species when they are engorged. thats such an awesome picture and such an awesome find.

 
Blood engorged tick
Worse yet, it was a 'find' alright - there were about 30 of these all in one spot. They only caught my eye because my shepherd was completely glued to the moose tracks and this one 'off colour' patch of sand... I don;t recall seeing hair all over the fence but I wonder now if the moose was rubbing them off? It did not look as though the moose had lain down at all...
Smtih, BC, Canada

 
Cattle ticks...
When I was a kid in South Texas, we had both little hard dark ticks that most people called "seed ticks" or "dog ticks." And we had what everyone called "cattle ticks." The cattle ticks were rather like this...they could appear either as smallish dark gray flaccid sacks, or when engorged, pale gray big fat sacks, and they were (if memory serves me) about the size of this one. They didn't seem as attracted to humans as the hard brown ticks, but they were attracted to dogs and cattle. One of the chores I hated most was picking these things off the dogs; they felt yucky. (I like a lot of bugs now, but I could never warm up to ticks.) I have no idea what they were, taxonomically, but this looks a lot like them. Maybe related species hang out with big grazers everywhere?

 
awesome
thats so cool. i really envy you

yep
Yeah, that's a blood-engorged tick alright. I should really know the species, but I plead that I study medical Entomology, and not arachnology.
-Sean McCann


triatoma.blogspot.com

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