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Photo#483591
bee like insect (beetle?) - Xylotrechus longitarsis

bee like insect (beetle?) - Xylotrechus longitarsis
Anacortes, Skagit County, Washington, USA
January 6, 2011
Size: 16mm
Found inside.
Looks very much like a bee but I have not seen a bee like this in the area before if it is one. The wings are not obvious and I didn't notice them until it flew. They are long and thin and are black with Yellow markings. It did not seem to fly well or far. More a short hop than sustained flight. Body is black with yellow stripes. Seems to have two distinct segments with head and thorax having little distinction. Abdomen tapers to a point. 6 legs. 2 on front segment (thorax area), 4 on abdomin.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Longhornedbeetle - Xylotrechus longitarsis?
I'm not an expert, but I think looks similar to this one :)



Oops! I did again :D (Ken beat me!)

 
That looks like a very good m
That looks like a very good match to me, I didn't find it when I used the guide though. Thanks! (Even though he beat you.)

Wait for the beetle experts, but
take a look at Xylotrechus longitarsis:



Looks to be something in that neighborhood, at any rate.

 
That looks like a very good m
That looks like a very good match to me, I didn't find it when I used the guide though. Thanks!

Please click on "edit"
and fill in the date field with the date of your sighting. This information can be most helpful in obtaining an ID.

Welcome to BugGuide!

 
Thanks!
I wasn't certain about doing that since it said only to add if found "in the wild." Which I wasn't sure how it was defined.

 
That's a tricky one
If a bug flies into your home, the date is appropriate because the bug was living in its natural habitat just before that. Dates are also okay for creatures whose natural habitat is indoors, such as bedbugs, cockroaches, and some spiders. The instruction about "in the wild" is meant to exclude misleading dates that result from artificial situations like bringing eggs indoors and raising insects from them there, where the temperature will cause faster or slower development than would occur outside.

 
Ah ok, got it.
Ah ok, got it.

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