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Family Adelgidae

winged bug Hemlock Woolly Adelgid - Adelges tsugae - Adelges tsugae Larch Woolly Adelgid??? - Adelges spruce galls - Adelges abietis Eastern Spruce Gall Adelgid - Adelges abietis Life cycle - Adelges abietis Life cycle - Adelges abietis Eggs? - Pineus strobi
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Sternorrhyncha (Plant-parasitic Hemipterans)
Superfamily Phylloxeroidea
Family Adelgidae
Numbers
Two genera and 22 species in the U.S. and Canada.
Identification
From "American Insects" by Ross H. Arnett, Jr.
pg. 314: 20. Adelgidae (Pine and Spruce Adelgid Family)[=Chermidae]
L. 2-3 mm. Front wing with reduced venation: antennae three-segmented in wingless females, four-segmented in sexual forms, and five-segmented in winged females; abdomen without cornicles. Wingless females and nymphs covered with waxy flocculence.

Adelges (Vallot)
Eleven species, the following of which are pests:
A. cooleyi (Gillette) Cooley Spruce Gall Adelgid
A. abietis (Linnaeus) Eastern Spruce Gall Adelgid
A. picea (Ratzeburg) Balsam Woolly Adelgid
A. tsugae (Annan) Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Pineus (Shimer)
Eleven species, the following of which are pests:
P. strobi (Hartig) Pine Bark Adelgid
P. pinifoliae (Fitch) Pine Leaf Adelgid
… Cheryl Moorehead, 17 October, 2006
Food
This small group is confined to conifers, feeding on needles, twigs, or on the galls they form.
Life Cycle
Multigenerational life cycles. Most species alternate their coniferous hosts.
Remarks
Some of the most destructive introduced pests belong to this group.
Internet References
Annual Review of Entomology. Biology and Evolution of Adelgidae.