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Photo#496621
Cockroach Nymphs?? - Blattella germanica

Cockroach Nymphs?? - Blattella germanica
Miami, South Florida County, Florida, USA
March 8, 2011
Size: less than 1/2 inch
this should help. and yes! these little buggers (get it?) are really fast. i haven't noticed any hairiness, though. they're very small.

Moved
German cockroaches look different as they progress through instars, and this is an early nymph. It is actually not possible to tell them apart as nymphs from other members of the genus Blattella, other than that German cockroaches are abundant indoors as opposed to the other members of the genus that venture inside only on occasion, and typically just as adults. Despite how common they are, we have remarkably few images of German cockroaches in the Guide, and so it is good to have this image.

I will add (because of comments on the linked image marked for deletion) that baiting for cockroaches is far more effective than spraying. BugGuide generally does not give out pest control advice, but this is one of those general bits of information that I feel does not cross the line.

Moved from Cockroaches and Termites.

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

I'm still not 100-percent sure, but this looks enough like a (very young) cockroach for me to move it here, where John Carlson will be able to tell us one way or another.

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