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Photo#51042
Bee - Eucera hamata - female

Bee - Eucera hamata - Female
Fairfield, Wayne County, Illinois, USA
May 3, 2006

Images of this individual: tag all
Bee - Eucera hamata - female Bee - Eucera hamata - female Bee - Eucera hamata - female

Moved

Moved
Moved from Synhalonia.

Synhalonia sp. - female
Before you posted the males (both on the wing and dying), I was not quite sure whether this superb bee belonged to the Anthophorine or Eucerine group, but now there is no doubt left. Actually, all these males were waiting for females near their favorite source of nectar, in a kind of lek.
Female has short antennae, is much more stoutly built than male and has more developed light bands on her abdomen, but this is all part of sexual dimporphism. Paleartic genus Eucera shows exactly the same.
Some authors consider the Eucerine group as a mere tribe (Eucerini) of the Anthophorinae subfamily.

 
Synhalonia is now considered a subgenus of genus Eucera
Eucerini is definitely a tribe (of Apinae), not a subfamily

this may be E. (S.) hamata but I'm not certain of this ID

 
Thanks
They (both males and females) have been quite indescriminant with regard to flowers. I have observed them on Amsonia tabernaemontana ( Blue Dogbane) most but also meet them at Iris versicolor (Blue flag) and garlic in the herb garden. The spider-prey was on a Phlox species nearby the Amsonia patch.

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