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Photo#521272
Unknown Beetle - Diomus amabilis

Unknown Beetle - Diomus amabilis
Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA
May 27, 2011
Size: ~1.5 mm
Came to light. Scymini?

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Beetle - Diomus amabilis Unknown Beetle - Diomus amabilis Unknown Beetle - Diomus amabilis Unknown Beetle - Diomus amabilis

Moved
Moved from Diomus.

probably D. amabilis actually
I referred this to Mike Quinn, who knows his TX beetles, and he says D. pseudotaedatus is VERY rare and only known in the entire word from southernmost TX. (Like, 5 specimens in the world!) But D. amabilis is "next door" in Louisiana, and could easily have expanded its range to TX since the map was drawn in 1985. I think we are safe moving this to D. amabilis.

 
D. amabilis
Thanks for tracking down this ID!

Definitely Diomus...
The antennae are distinctive, and this pattern is seen in a number of Diomus spp. Not sure which, though...none of are mapped for Harris Co. in Gordon. D. pseudotaedatus probably is the best bet but I wouldn't rule out a range-stretching D. amabilis either.


Moved from Dusky Lady Beetles.

Maybe not scymini, after all?
After moving the images, I was looking through the TexasEnto site and saw what I think may be the same species, or near: http://bugguide.net/node/view/473496

The BG page says its range is southmost Texas, so if it is that species, Houston might be a range extension.

I photographed a similar specimen in July 2009 in the same location.

 
must be same indeed... i'll refer the matter to Abby
my problem is, i'm too damn old, and in my early days Diomus was a lowly subgenus of Scymnus

Moved
Moved from Beetles. Thanks for confirmation, V.

Scymini indeed
nice.

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