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Photo#53448
Brown Beetle - Synchroa punctata

Brown Beetle - Synchroa punctata
Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
May 22, 2006
Size: 11mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Beetle Larva - Synchroa punctata Beetle Pupa - Synchroa punctata Brown Beetle - Synchroa punctata

Identified by:
Christopher Majka - Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History.

 
Large beetle?
On 7/21/09 I went out side around 10:00 pm and the cats were playing w something. So I went and looked and saw this large bug. I then quickly grabbed a jar. I have been searching to find out what this bug is? I am in Milton-Freewater, OR right on the border of Washington. I have never seen a bug like this before, just small black beetles. Is this bug harmful? Does it live in the ground? Any info is greatly appreciated.

 
Large Beetle
If your beetle was about 2 inches long, it might have been something like this one. Beetles are harmless to people and pets. The worst it might do is give a pinch with it's jaws.

 
Can you tell me if this beetle has wings?
I'm trying to identify a bug we found in our bedroom last night, and hoping it's not a cockroach. What we have has wings, does this beetle have wings or just a hard shell?

 
It has wings
The elytra (hard wings) are what you see, but it also has a normal pair of wings under that.

Hi Tom
You've reared a synchroid, another beetle whose larvae are plentiful but the adults of which are seldom seen -- unless you rear the larvae. The elongate shape and signature mustache are what to look for in this family.

 
synchroid
Thanks Jim, it looks like a cockroack that's a beetle.

 
Formerly Alleculidae?
Were these beetles once classified in the "comb-clawed beetle" family Alleculidae (now itself part of Tenebrionidae)? I have a fair number of specimens in my collection, found mostly at lights at night.

 
No, Melan*dryidae,
at least according to American Beetles, but they were removed from that family in 1931.

Interesting about the lights. I've run my lights in wooded areas thick with synchroids and Allecu*lines and don't recall either showing up. (I made a quick check of Images. It would be just like me to say none ever came to my lights when I had 3 or 4 posted that were photographed on my moth sheet :-)

 
I can't make that claim about allecul*ines anymore.
I've now had more than a few come to lights.

 
Give it time
and lots of unusual things will show up at your lights. I've had butterflies and dragonflies show up at night.

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