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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#537674
Marpissa what? - epigynum ventral - Marpissa obtusa - female

Marpissa what? - epigynum ventral - Marpissa obtusa - Female
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
August 13, 2010
Size: 4.5mm
I'm betting this is Marpissa obtusa. Barnes 1958 describes the female from two specimens, whose drawing you can see here (also found in Barnes 1958). Notice that the copulatory openings are angled towards each other, as in the above image. Barnes 1958 reports that the openings in lineata are aimed laterally, as you can see here.

Compare this image with the M. lineata epigynum.

[This image replaces my original less-clear one.]

Images of this individual: tag all
Marpissa what? - dorsal - Marpissa obtusa - female Marpissa what? - side - Marpissa obtusa - female Marpissa what? - portrait - Marpissa obtusa - female Marpissa what? - ventral - Marpissa obtusa - female Marpissa what? - epigynum ventral - Marpissa obtusa - female

Replaced epigynum shot
I've posted a clearer image of the epigynum. She really is beautiful.

Moved
Moved from Marpissa.

..
> whose drawing you can see here

That's Logunov's (1999c) drawing; according to Proszynski, Barnes' illustration of the female is M. dentoides.

 
Also, Barnes 1958 reports tha
Also, Barnes 1958 reports that the M. dentoides epigynum is "essentially the same as" that of M. sulcosa (see M. sulcosa here).

 
Salticidae.org is mistaken. I
Salticidae.org is mistaken. I am now double-checking the Barnes 1958 paper. He reports drawing that epigynum from one holotype obtusa collected at Palacios, Texas, and from one paratype collected at Big Bend, Texas -- he had two females.

 
Okay, I see what you mean --
Okay, I see what you mean -- what a mess.

 
Just for the record here, app
Just for the record here, apparently Logunov lumped obtusa in with dentoides, but there's some argument over whether this is correct. I'm filing conservatively under obtusa. It's easier to merge later than to split, should it resolve that way.

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